Sessions  &  Speakers 2017
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March 11, 2017
Chesapeake College
Wye Mills, MD
 Session titles and speakers for the 2017 BTO Conference are listed below, organized by general topics:  Craft of Writing, Genre, Publishing/Marketing, Social Media for Writing and Poetry. 





LYNN SCHWARTZ – It’s Not A Formula: Developing A Satisfying Plot
Publishing & Marketing
Sessions
Genre Sessions
Social Media for Writers Sessions
BARBARA ESSTMAN – SHOW vs. TELL: Just How Does that Work?

AUSTIN CAMACHO ​– Bringing Diversity to Your Characters

GREGG WILHELM – ​Publishing and Not Perishing: 
                                   Options for Writers Who Want to Be Read
Craft of Writing Sessions
 Poetry Sessions
When your book is ready, what are your publishing options? "Legacy" publishing is no longer a writer's only, or perhaps even best, choice. But do you have all the skill sets, and bank account, to self-publish? What are the pros and cons of using online publishing service providers? Recommendations for online and print publication channels, contests, literary agents, and independent publishers will be explored in this lively question-and-answer session.

Gregg Wilhelm is Founder Emeritus of CityLit Project and publisher of CityLit Press. He has been in publishing and arts administration for 25 years, and teaches writing and publishing courses at several colleges. He earned his MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Tampa in 2014. Gregg has since received a Rubys Artist Grant and a Maryland Individual Artist Award for his fiction.


Though a lot of our marketing efforts have moved online, many authors still use a "street team" to help promote their books. This collaborative effort can be a powerful way to boost your signal! In this presentation, you'll learn what a street team is, how to assemble and coordinate the right team for your book, and some best practices and tips on how to leverage this tactic effectively. 

Ally E. Machate is an award-winning book editor, and expert publishing consultant who loves using her insider knowledge of the publishing industry and wealth of experience to help others reach their publishing goals, whether it’s showing a writer how to improve a manuscript, get an agent, or self-publish, or ghostwriting a book to help an entrepreneur skyrocket her business platform to new levels. Since 1999, she has assisted, guided, and supported would-be authors on their publishing journey and takes pride in serving as their books’ best ally. Grab Ally’s free gifts and learn more at www.thewritersally.com and www.allymachate.com.


ALLY MACHATE –  Forming and Using a Book Marketing "Street Team"
We live in a world filled with people who don't look like you, the writer, and often have major cultural differences. A diverse cast is more interesting to your readers. The trick is to portray people of other groups accurately, and without offending anyone. Austin Camacho offers some tips on how to do both in this class.

Crime novelist Austin Camacho is a popular speaker and instructor on the craft of writing. The author of six books in the Hannibal Jones detective series and five action adventure novels, he is a past president of the Maryland Writer's Association. He is also author of Successfully Marketing Your Novel in the 21st Century, and his small press, Intrigue Publishing, presents the Creatures, Crimes & Creativity conference for genre fiction in Columbia MD. He blogs at http://www.ascamacho.blogspot.com.
AUSTIN CAMACHO – One Writer's Marketing Journey
There is no shortage of sound advice out there about how to best market your new book. But how do you know which of these techniques will work for YOU? In this class, author and publisher Austin Camacho shares his own experiences, revealing the small changes that can make a big difference to your marketing success.

Crime novelist Austin Camacho is a popular speaker and instructor on the craft of writing. The author of six books in the Hannibal Jones detective series and five action adventure novels, he is a past president of the Maryland Writer's Association. He is also author of Successfully Marketing Your Novel in the 21st Century, and his small press, Intrigue Publishing, presents the Creatures, Crimes & Creativity conference for genre fiction in Columbia MD. He blogs at http://www.ascamacho.blogspot.com.

LAURA OLIVER  Accepted! Tips for Developing a Stand-out Style
magazines and top-tier literary reviews (The Washington Post, Country Living Magazine, The Writer Magazine, The Writer’s Guide 2013, Glimmer Train Stories, The Sun Magazine, Charleston Magazine, Portland Magazine, The Baltimore Review,) Among other distinctions, she is the recipient of a Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award in Fiction, the Anne Arundel County Arts Council Annie Award for Literary Achievement, two Glimmer Train Short Fiction finalist awards, and her work has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize. Oliver holds an MFA in Creative Writing and Literature from Bennington College and has completed writing seminars in creative non-fiction at the University of Iowa.


KATHRYN JOHNSON  – Conflict, Action and Suspense: 
                                            Adding the Power that Sells
It's often said that without conflict there is no story. It also holds true that strengthening the conflict in any type of fiction will bump up the tension and turn a limp, ordinary tale into an extraordinary adventure that will keep readers turning pages until The End. Whether you choose to write literary fiction, mysteries, family sagas, thrillers, historical fiction, sci-fi or fantasy—you can learn techniques for drawing readers into your tales through action, dialogue, setting details, and plot twists that make your work stand out from the crowd. 

Kathryn Johnson (aka Mary Hart Perry) teaches creative writing for The Writer's Center, in Bethesda, Maryland. She is a popular speaker for the Smithsonian Associates programs and appears regularly at regional and national writers’ conferences. She also is the CEO of a writer's mentoring service: www.WriteByYou.com. An Agatha Award finalist, and winner of the Heart of Excellence and Bookseller's Best Awards, for her historical fiction, Kathryn is currently working on a new Victorian mystery series and continues her contemporary thriller series, Affairs of State. More than 40 of her novels have been published.​
​​Laura Oliver is the author of The Story Within: New Insights and Inspiration for Writers (Penguin Random House,) named by The Writer Magazine as one of the best writing books of the year. Already in its fifth printing, it was additionally selected by Poets and Writers Magazine as one of the best writing books published to date. In addition, Oliver is an award-winning writer and workshop instructor at St. John's College and has taught both fiction and essay writing at the University of Maryland and the Writer's Center. Oliver's fiction and essays are published in national newspapers, 
Agents, editors and publishers agree that the single most important criteria for having work accepted for publication is a compelling style. In this workshop we learn what literary style is, why it is so singularly important to agents, publishers and readers alike, and how to acquire a style unique to you—one readers can’t put down. Through examples, exercises, tips and developmental techniques, we will learn to identify and polish your very personal authorial style for success.

GAIL BARRETT  – Stop Messing with My Head!
                               A Crash Course on Point of View
Point of view: What is it? Why does it matter?The award-winning author of fifteen published novels explains the basics of this essential craft technique, and how it brings power and immediacy to your writing.

Gail Barrett is the award-winning author of fifteen romantic suspense novels. A former RITA® finalist, Gail has received countless awards, including the Book Buyer’s Best Award, the Holt Medallion, The National Readers’ Choice Award, the Daphne du Maurier Award for excellence in romantic suspense, and Romance Writers of America’s prestigious Golden Heart. She lives in Hagerstown, Maryland. For more information, visit her website: www.gailbarrett.com.
Plot is the organizing force that makes our stories progress and insists that something happen, but plot cannot stand alone. In good fiction and memoir, it’s essential to support plot with other elements of craft such as characterization, theme, suspense, and conflict. Let’s explore how to create satisfying stories, to avoid formulaic plots, and to understand how characters drive an organic narrative from beginning to end.

Lynn Auld Schwartz is a writer, story development editor, and has ghostwritten three books. Her plays have been performed in Atlanta and NYC, including Lincoln Center. She founded the Temple Bar Literary Reading Series in NYC. She has received two Individual Artist Awards in Fiction from the Maryland State Arts Council, and an Annie Literary Arts Award from the Arts Council of Anne Arundel County. Her stories have appeared in literary journals and she produces and directs the Page To 
Every writer has heard the rule, “Show, don’t tell,” and then been confused by what that means. Do you always show and never tell? How do you tell if you’re telling too much? Join us in demystifying this first commandment of writing and learn how to make it work for you. 

Internationally published and nationally awarded author Barbara Esstman, MFA 
and NEA fellow, is the co-editor of A More Perfect Union: Stories and Poems about the Modern Wedding (St. Martin’s Press). Her novels, The Other Anna and Night Ride Home, were both published by Harcourt Brace, HarperPerennial, and
 numerous foreign presses, and they were both adapted for film by Hallmark Productions. Among other distinctions, her short stories have been recognized by the Pushcart Prizes and the Redbook Fiction Award. She teaches creative writing and creative nonfiction at universities and The Writer’s Center in Bethesda, MD, and does developmental editing with individual clients.
How can you create fully fleshed characters and satisfying plots within the strict confines of the short story? Join award-winning short story writer Art Taylor for a discussion of this sometimes challenging form. After writing your own six-sentence story, you’ll examine the architecture of the short story (linear vs. modular), explore scenes as the building blocks of short fiction, and draw on sources as diverse at Cinderella, Doc Savage, and South Park for guidance and inspiration. 

Art Taylor is an associate professor of English at George Mason University and the author of On the Road with Del & Louise: A Novel in Stories, winner of the Agatha Award for Best First Novel and a finalist for both the Anthony Award and the Macavity Award for Best First Novel. He edited Murder Under the Oaks: Bouchercon Anthology 2015, currently a finalist for the Anthony Award for Best Anthology or Collection. He has also won two Agatha Awards, an Anthony Award, a Macavity Award, and three consecutive Derringer Awards for his short fiction. For more information, visit www.arttaylorwriter.com.  


​ART TAYLOR ​– The Short Story: Big Worlds in Small Spaces
TARA LASKOWSKI   – Tiny but Mighty: How to Write Amazing Flash Fiction
Imagine it: An evocative, complete short story in 1000 words or less. This session will focus on flash fiction, the form taking online publishing by storm. Tara Laskowski, longtime editor of the flash fiction journal SmokeLong Quarterly, will define this type of writing and its many forms—from microfiction to novellas-in-flash—and walk you through some dos and don'ts for crafting your own tiny stories.

Tara Laskowski's short-story collection, Bystanders, was hailed by Jennifer Egan as "a bold, riveting mash-up of Hitchcockian suspense and campfire-tale chills." She is also the author of Modern Manners For Your Inner Demons, tales of dark etiquette. Her fiction has been published in the Norton anthology Flash Fiction International, Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, Mid-American Review, and other places. Since 2010, she has been the editor of the online flash fiction journal SmokeLong Quarterly. 

PANEL: Writing for the Inspirational Market 
Moderator Melanie Rigney,  with Michele Chynoweth, and Cheryl Somers Aubin
ROBERT BLAKE WHITEHILL  – The Heart of the Thriller: the Interface  
                                                       of Research and Creativity
The Heart of the Thriller explores the key elements that grab your readers by the collar and drag them from a breathtaking opener to a soul-curdling finish. Aspects include crackling dialogue, shocking set pieces, blistering tempo, action founded in gut-wrenching emotional truth, and how to be your protagonist's worst enemy.

Eastern Shore native Robert Blake Whitehill is an award-winning author of the Chesapeake based Ben Blackshaw Series, with a Book of the Month win from Conversations Book Club for the series opener, Deadrise. A highly rated TV writer for Discovery true crime programs, Whitehill also has screenwriting wins at the Hamptons International Film Festival, the Hudson Valley Film Festival, and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.  Deadrise, Nitro Express, and Tap Rack Bang are all in development as feature films with HatLine Productions. www.robertblakewhitehill.com

Image courtesy of  www.corsicastudio.com
LORIANN OBERLIN –  Writing Difficult People into Your Fiction and Nonfiction     
We all know that conflict drives a good novel and that accuracy in all types of writing is essential. So how do you accurately depict “difficult” people into your characterization? There are clinical definitions of self-absorbed, passive-aggressive, or sociopathic characters, but this workshop will go beyond diagnostic criteria that you could look up on your own. It will show how people with various psychological challenges interact with others at work or within families, provide realistic therapeutic settings as well as emergency psych situations, and challenge your own creativity to go beyond clichés and stereotypes.

Loriann Oberlin is the author of numerous non-fiction titles including the 2016 edition of Overcoming Passive-Aggression as well as Surviving Separation & Divorce and a new eBook series Writing to Make Money. She’s written 12 non-fiction titles and two women's fiction novels under the pen name Lauren Monroe. Oberlin has a master's degree in clinical counseling from Johns Hopkins University and has a private therapy practice with offices in Montgomery County and in Easton, MD. www.loriannoberlin.com.




GAIL BARRETT – Writing Romance that Resonates
Everyone likes a love story. Romance novels are the top selling genre in fiction, generating over a billion dollars a year in sales. But what makes a love story resonate? Why do some novels languish in the slush pile while others prompt an editor to make that coveted “call?” The author of fifteen romantic suspense novels shares the techniques she uses to catch the attention of an editor and tug on a reader’s heart.

Gail Barrett is the award-winning author of fifteen romantic suspense novels. A former RITA® finalist, Gail has received countless awards, including the Book Buyer’s Best Award, the Holt Medallion, The National Readers’ Choice Award, the Daphne du Maurier Award for excellence in romantic suspense, and Romance Writers of America’s prestigious Golden Heart. She lives in Hagerstown, Maryland. For more information, visit her website: www.gailbarrett.com.
LORIANN OBERLIN – Writing to Make Money – A Quicker Approach
We write for many reasons. Yet when we derive a paycheck — regardless of the amount — it validates us like nothing else can. Even if the project you want to write takes months or years to finish, you may need to make extra income while you pursue creative dreams. Learn how to effectively use even five hours a week to broaden your chances of getting published as you boost your bank account. Oberlin detailed how to profit from non-fiction for Writer’s Digest Books and in Writing for Quick Cash (AMACOM). In this session she shares strategies from Writing To Make Money, her new book which details dozens of ways to improve your writing income this year.

Loriann Oberlin is the author of numerous non-fiction titles including the 2016 edition of Overcoming Passive-Aggression as well as Surviving Separation & Divorce and a new eBook series Writing to Make Money. She’s written 12 non-fiction titles and two women's fiction novels. Oberlin spent more than three decades contributing to women's, parenting, bridal, airline and other publications. She’s written greeting cards and done public relations work. She also taught freelance writing at community colleges, through Writers Digest Online School and the former Barnes & Noble University workshops. www.loriannoberlin.com.

JOHN LEWIS and JIM DUFFY – Telling and Selling Stories 
If you can tell a good story, you can sell a good story. Many writers are capable of crafting solid stories, but can’t find suitable outlets for their work. This session will provide useful and constructive tips on how to develop, present, and, ultimately, sell nonfiction articles for publication.  


John Lewis grew up listening to stories being told on the “liar’s bench” at the back of his uncle’s country store in Dorchester County and has spent the last 25 years telling and selling stories, both in print and online. He has written for a wide range of publications, including Rolling Stone, Oxford American, The Washington Post Magazine, and AARP The Magazine. He currently teaches writing at Maryland Institute College of Art and is editor-at-large at Baltimore magazine. 

Jim Duffy learned to tell stories the old-fashioned way, as a cub reporter for a small newspaper outside of Chicago. He then moved into magazines, serving as a staff editor at Baltimore Magazine, Chesapeake Bay Magazine, among other regional publications. Today, his storytelling focus is the culture and character of the Delmarva Peninsula. He is the founder of Secrets of the Eastern Shore, which celebrates that storied region in words, pictures, and products. The first Secrets guidebook, Eastern Shore Road Trips: 27 One-Day Adventures on Delmarva was published in 2016.
Many writers of nonfiction secretly yearn to try their hand at storytelling. But that prospect can be intimidating. Inventing characters, plots, and dialogue calls upon skill sets and mental habits different from writing journalism, ad copy, or how-to books. After a long career writing and editing nonfiction, in his sixties Robert Bidinotto pursued his lifelong dream of writing his first novel. Now the author of best-selling, award-winning thrillers, Robert will share the unique challenges and rewards of storytelling over expository writing. He’ll also offer tips and advice on how to navigate the transition happily and successfully.

Robert Bidinotto is the author of the acclaimed crime thriller Hunter — a #1 Amazon Kindle bestseller in “Mysteries & Thrillers” and a Wall Street Journal “Top Ten Fiction Ebook.” Bad Deeds, the first sequel in his “Dylan Hunter” thriller series, won the CLFA “2014 Book of the Year” award. Before turning full-time to fiction, Robert was an award-winning magazine editor, a nonfiction author of books about crime, and a prolific writer of commentaries, reviews, and investigative articles. A former Staff Writer for Reader’s Digest, Robert also is a frequent public speaker and talk-show guest. Visit his blog, “The Vigilante Author,” at HunterThrillers.com.

MINDIE BURGOYNE  – Beyond What I Did on Vacation: 
                                        An Introduction to Travel Writing
EMILY RICH  Going From Draft to Craft: 
                         Submitting Your Work to Literary Magazines

Writers who love to travel will enjoy this session on how to turn your travel experiences into writing that media outlets will pay for and publish. Discover the multiple specializations in travel writing and which ones may fit your style. Also learn about various media outlets that currently publish submissions from travel writing and tips for how to break in to this competitive genre.  

Mindie Burgoyne is a travel writer and blogger living in Somerset County, Maryland. She has six books published by The History Press - all focused on the Eastern Shore, and currently writes a travel column for the Delmarva Daily Times. Her travel articles and photographs have been published by CBS News, The Washington Post, National Geographic Television Network, Coastal Style Magazine, What’s Up? Magazines and many online media outlets. She is the former publisher of The Pastoral Press, a religious book publishing company, and she operates the travel blog www.travelhag.com. Email Mindie at mindie@travelhag.com.

ROBERT BIDINOTTO – Rejecting Reality: Making the Leap from 
                                        Nonfiction to Novels  
​KHRIS BAXTER – Screenwriting Techniques for Writing Effective Dialogue
“It’s not just that dialogue sounds like music to me. It actually is music.” — Aaron Sorkin 
Dialogue is much more than just putting words into your characters' mouths. In this workshop we'll look at examples from some of the masters of Film & TV dialogue and discuss ways for you to elevate and energize the dialogue in your novel, short stories, memoir, etc. In the process we'll discuss techniques for crafting dialogue that reveals character, advances plot, and makes your writing come alive. For all levels and genres.

Khris Baxter is a screenwriter, producer, and co-founder of Boundary Stone Films which develops, finances, and produces a wide range of projects for Film and TV. Baxter has been a screenwriter for two decades and has taught screenwriting since 2004, most recently at The MFA in Creative Writing at Queens University, and American University. He’s been a judge for the annual Virginia Screenwriting Competition since 2004, and is the co-founder of the Telluride Screenwriting Conference held annually in Telluride, CO.

Feeling called to write from your soul? You just might be surprised to learn how vast… and varied… the opportunities in the inspirational market are, from devotionals to essays to short stories and novels and more. Learn how to identify where your work fits, how to fine tune your craft, and how to pitch successfully from three women who took two different paths. 

Melanie Rigney writes for Living Faith, the largest  Catholic daily devotional, and is the author or co-author of three books: Blessed Are You: Finding Inspiration from Our Sisters in Faith and Sisterhood of Saints: Daily Guidance and Inspiration (both Franciscan Media) and When They Come Home: Ways to Welcome Returning Catholics (Twenty-third Publications). Melanie, a former editor of Writer’s Digest, works with writers, publishers and agents through her consultancy, Editor for You, founded in 2003. Find her at www.melanierigney.com and www.editorforyou.com.

The author of three contemporary novels full of suspense and romance that bring Old Testament stories in the Bible to life for today's readers, Michele Chynoweth moved from self-publishing to publishing with a small Christian publisher onto success with a larger traditional publisher. Michele is also an inspirational speaker, writing instructor for Cecil College’s Continuing Education program and book coach. More information about Michele and her books is available on her website, www.michelechynoweth.com or about her consultant services at www.bookcoachmichele.com.

​Cheryl Somers Aubin has been writing and publishing for over 25 years, and her work has appeared in The Washington Post, Boston Globe, Foundation Magazine, and other newspapers, magazines, and online journals. She has an MA in Writing from Johns Hopkins University and is the author of the book, The Survivor Tree: Inspired by a True Story. Cheryl teaches memoir writing and is a featured speaker at book festivals, writing conferences, and workshops. She is the nonfiction co-editor for the literary journal Delmarva Review. Cheryl can be reached at aubin.mail@cox.net www.cherylaubin.com www.thesurvivortree.com
Most people think you take a few recipes and bind them up into a nice little book. This class will teach the basics you have to know. 
People collect old family recipes, or ask their mothers or grandmothers for them. However, what you cook may never resemble what they did. Why? Because there were always those “magic ingredients” or measurements they never told you about. The same holds true for those recipes friends give you, or you clip out of the paper. Unless you’re willing to test them, think about them, write about them, or dream how they should really be, it will be impossible to write a cookbook. It’s not as easy as you think.

Cookbook author Katie Moose is the co-author of The Best of Newport; author of Annapolis: The Guidebook, Eastern Shore of Maryland: The Guidebook, God’s Bounty: 365 Days of Inspirational Cooking; Chesapeake’s Bounty, Chesapeake’s Bounty II, New England’s Bounty, Nantucket’s Bounty; and Maryland’s Western Shore: The Guidebook. She is a consultant on international business and protocol. Her hobbies include gourmet cooking, fine wines, history, sailing, genealogy, gardening, theology, and travel.








Publishing your work in a literary magazine is an essential part of building your writer’s resume. But where do you start? In this session, we’ll explore the world of lit-mags, from the big dogs to the small regional publications to the burgeoning online market. You’ll learn how to research markets and determine which ones are right for your work and you’ll get a tutorial on Submittable, the online submissions engine used by most lit-mags and many other markets as well. Finally, you’ll get some insights on common submission mistakes from a seasoned lit-mag editor.

Emily Rich is Deputy Editor of Little Patuxent Review and an editorial advisor for The Delmarva Review. She writes mainly memoir and essay. Her work has been published in a number of small presses including Little Patuxent Review, r.kv.ry, The Delmarva Review, the Pinch and Hippocampus. Her essays have been listed as notables in Best American Essays 2014 and 2015. Her story "Black Market Pall Malls" won the Biostories 2015 War and Peace essay contest.
LEIGH-ANNE LAWRENCE – Networking Online: Twitter for Authors
Today's authors need to not only be excellent writers but marketers and self-promoters. Compared to other social media networks, Twitter is one of the best sites for building a professional author platform. This session will teach writers how to effectively use Twitter to promote their work and build their personal brand online. 

Leigh-Anne Lawrence is the Director of Marketing and Media Relations at Piedmont Virginia Community College in Charlottesville. She has worked in the public relations field for more than 10 years and specializes in professional writing, brand management, and social media training for higher education institutions, small businesses, and independent professionals. She frequently speaks on social media and PR best practices at regional and national conferences and is a regular contributor to the National Council for Marketing and Public Relations (NCMPR) blog. Visit her online at www.leighannelawrence.com. 


MINDIE BURGOYNE – 7 Ways to Raise Your Author Platform 
                                      Through Social Media
​An author platform is a level of believability and influence that an author has that he or she can leverage in order to sell books and writing. How do you present yourself as an opinion leader, an expert or an authority in your field? How do you as an author command attention from a reading audience? In this presentation learn 7 ways you can raise your author platform through using social media and online tools. 

Mindie Burgoyne is a travel writer and blogger living in Somerset County, Maryland. She has six books published by The History Press – all focused on the Eastern Shore, and currently writes a travel column for the Delmarva Daily Times. Her travel articles and photographs have been published by CBS News, The Washington Post, National Geographic Television Network, Coastal Style Magazine, What’s Up? Magazines and many online media outlets. She is the former publisher of The Pastoral Press, a religious book publishing company, and she operates the travel blog www.travelhag.com. Email Mindie at mindie@travelhag.com
LESLIE WALKER – Social Media Tools for Writers
From Reddit to Storify and LinkedIn Pulse, there are a ton of social media tools that can help writers. Learn about the wide range of social platforms and apps (beyond Facebook and Twitter) available to help you do smarter research, broaden your audience and connect with new people in your field. In this session, we'll review some of the most useful tools to consider adding to your social media repertoire.

Leslie Walker has been the visiting professor in digital innovation at the University of Maryland’s Philip Merrill College of Journalism since 2008. She teaches courses in multimedia journalism, social media and the business of news. Previously, she was Co-Editor of American Journalism Review and worked a columnist, reporter and editor for The Washington Post for 16 years. She led the digital news team as Editor and vice president for news at WashingtonPost.com in the early days of Internet news. Walker also is the author of Sudden Fury, a nonfiction book that was made into a television movie.
POETRY PANEL –  Perfect Words for an Imperfect World
Meredith Hadaway, Moderator, with Le HintonAmanda Newell 
and Renée K. Nicholson
​How can personal narrative restore some sense of order in a disintegrating world? Four poets discuss the power of poetry to bring us through times that are physically, spiritually—and yes, politically—challenging. Each will discuss how poems that bear witness to struggle—through our own stories and those of others—can inspire work that engages us all. 

Meredith Davies Hadaway is the author of three poetry collections. Her most recent, At The Narrows, won the 2015 Delmarva Book Prize for creative writing. Hadaway has received fellowships from the Virginia Center for Creative Arts, an Individual Artist Award from the Maryland State Arts Council and multiple Pushcart nominations. She is a former Rose O’Neill Writer-in-Residence at Washington College, where she taught English and creative writing in addition to serving as vice president for communications and marketing.

Le Hinton is the author of five poetry collections including The Language of Moisture and Light (Iris G. Press, 2014). His work has been widely published and can be found in The Best American Poetry 2014, Little Patuxent Review, The Summerset Review, the Baltimore Review, Pittsburgh Poetry Review, and outside Clipper Magazine Stadium in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, incorporated into Derek Parker's sculpture Common Thread. He is the founder and co-editor of the poetry journal Fledgling Rag.

Amanda Newell is the 2015 winner of the Patricia Dobler Poetry Award, judged by Lynn Emanuel. Recent work has appeared in Bellevue Literary Review, Pittsburgh Poetry Review, storySouth, War, Literature & the Arts, and Zone 3, among others. Her poem, “Recommendation,” which appeared in Bellevue Literary Review’s recent war-themed issue, was featured on the BLR website and selected to be performed at New York University’s Langone Medical Center as part of BLR’s “Off the Page Series.” Her chapbook of poems, Fractured Light, also won the Dogfish Head Poetry Prize. She is currently pursuing her MFA from Warren Wilson College, and she teaches English at The Gunston School.

A past Emerging Writer-in-Residence at Penn State–Altoona, and author of the poetry collection Roundabout Directions to Lincoln CenterRenée K. Nicholson is assistant professor in the Programs for Multi- and Interdisciplinary Studies at West Virginia University, where she also is part of an expressive writing program at the Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Institute’s infusion center. She is a recipient of grants from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts, the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation and elsewhere, and her writing has appeared in Poets & Writers, Midwestern Gothic, Moon City Review, The Gettysburg Review and elsewhere. Her website is www.reneenicholson.com.

JAMES ALLEN HALL  – Poetic Apertures: 
                                         Condensing and Expansive Strategies for Writing Poems
“Change your form and you change your nature,” Louise Glück writes at the end of “Parable of the Dove.” It takes nerve to change a poem’s nature, and this craft session will help us think about ways of altering, focusing, and expanding a poem’s lens. We'll see what poems of wide and small scope look like, what they achieve, and how they work their magic on us—all so that we may wield this sorcery on our own readers.

James Allen Hall is the author of Now You're the Enemy (U of Arkansas, 2008), which won awards from the Lambda Literary Foundation, the Texas Institute of Letters, and the Fellowship of Southern Writers. A new book of lyric personal essays, I Liked You Better Before I Knew You So Well, won the Cleveland State University Press Essay Collection Award and has just been published. Hall's poems have appeared in New England Review, A Public Space, Boston Review, Agni, American Poetry Review, and Best American Poetry 2012. A recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment of the Arts and the New York Foundation for the Arts, he teaches creative writing at Washington College in Chestertown, MD.
Photo Credit: Tamzin Smith
ERIN MURPHY  – Writing Documentary Poetry

Just as documentary photographers take to the streets to capture particular moments in time, documentary poets engage with primary sources to chronicle historical events and everyday life. In this workshop, we will discuss how to use letters, diaries, transcripts, and other materials to create persona, collage, and erasure poems. 
Presenter: Erin Murphy

Erin Murphy is the author of six books of poetry, most recently Ancilla (Lamar University Press, 2014), and is co-editor of two anthologies from SUNY Press: Making Poems: Forty Poems with Commentary by the Poets and Creating Nonfiction: Twenty Essays and Interviews with the Writers. Her poems have appeared or are forthcoming in such journals as The Georgia Review, The Normal School, Field, Southern Humanities Review, North American Review, Women’s Studies Quarterly, and Southern Indiana Review and have 
MEREDITH DAVIES HADAWAY - Location, Location, Location:
                                                        Poetry of Place
What do we mean by “eco-poetry” and how can it help us reimagine our world? We will explore ways to go beyond “nature poetry,” tapping the generative power of a particular place to engage our creative energies, to hone our voices, and to enact our connection to everything around us.

Meredith Davies Hadaway is the author of three poetry collections. Her most recent, At The Narrows, won the 2015 Delmarva Book Prize for creative writing. Hadaway has received fellowships from the Virginia Center for Creative Arts, an Individual Artist Award from the Maryland State Arts Council and multiple Pushcart nominations. She is a former Rose O’Neill Writer-in-Residence at Washington College, where she taught English and creative writing in addition to serving as vice president for communications and marketing.

Photo Credit: Tamzin Smith
Stage series, which offers regional writers the opportunity to perform their life stories. A graduate of The City College of New York, Columbia University, and The Neighborhood Playhouse School of the Theater, Schwartz teaches fiction and memoir at St. John’s College and The Writer’s Center. www.writerswordhouse.com.
been featured on Garrison Keillor’s The Writer’s Almanac. Her anthology publications include 180 More: Extraordinary Poems for Every Day edited by Billy Collins (Random House) and The Art of Losing edited by Kevin Young (Bloomsbury), She is Professor of English at Penn State University, Altoona College. Website: www.erin-murphy.com
GLEN FINLAND – True Lies: What Is Remembered in Memoir Writing
The Chinese claim there are three kinds of truth: There is my truth, your truth, and the truth. Let’s explore how we find the courage to simply say-- this is me looking you in the eye and promising you this is what really happened. This is what is remembered. 

Glen Finland is a freelance journalist and the author of Next Stop: An Autistic Son Grows Up, a 2012 Barnes&Noble Discover Pick and Penguin's Book Club choice for National Disability Employment Awareness Month. Her essays have appeared in the Washington Post, Family Circle, Revolution, Parenting, American Magazine, Wired, Babble, Autism Speaks and Washington Parents Magazine. A featured autism advocate on radio and TV she is also the mother of three grown sons and a Visiting Writer at American University.  
Next Stop is now an audio book, recorded by the author for the National Library Services for the Blind. Reno Productions has optioned the book for a film to begin production in 2017.  www.glenfinland.com

KATIE MOOSE – Want to Write a Cookbook? It’s Not as Easy as You Think!